CIF Grantees

Autism Diagnosis

Autism Diagnosis funding enables Interdisciplinary teams to work together to quickly and accurately diagnose autism.

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Early diagnosis can significantly improve treatment outcomes for children with autism spectrum disorder, yet many rural communities lack the necessary medical resources to conduct accurate screenings. To provide timely diagnostic services to as many Kansas families as possible, Autism Diagnostic Teams (ADTs) are trained and provided with the necessary materials to offer early childhood screenings and/or assist schools and families in developing individual treatment plans and streamlined service delivery. ADTs are drawn from local school districts, tiny-k/Part C Infant-Toddler networks, and mental health professionals.

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Child Care Quality Initiative

The Child Care Quality Initiative program offers outreach and training on protective factors to help establish nurturing early environments.

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Whether helping parents locate child care in their area or offering continuing education to providers, the Child Care Quality Initiative (CCQI) is committed to making high-quality child care available to all Kansas families. Through the Strengthening Families program, CCQI trains, coaches, and provides technical assistance to child care providers. CCQI also helps underserved communities identify and address child care needs, both day-to-day and emergency.

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Early Childhood Block Grant

The Early Childhood Block Grant program provides education and support services for at-risk young children and their families.

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Because the years between birth and kindergarten are crucial to a child’s overall development, Early Childhood Block Grant (ECBG) recipients focus on providing services to at-risk young children (ages 0-5 years) and their families. Public-private partnerships are encouraged to avoid duplication, maximize resources, and foster innovation. Involving families in the process of readying their children for school is another hallmark of the ECBG program’s emphasis on collaboration.

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ECBG 2017-18 Report

ECBG in Kansas 

Snapshot of Levels of Risk in Kansas

Infant Toddler Hearing Aid Loan Bank

The Loan Bank provides hearing aids for infants in need.

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An infant with hearing loss can suffer dramatic developmental delays, especially if the condition isn’t diagnosed and addressed early. The Kansas Infant Toddler Hearing Aid Loan Bank (HALB) helps remove financial barriers to fitting children with hearing aids by making a range of amplification devices available for families to borrow. With a goal of diagnosis by three months, and intervention no later than six months, HALB strives to give Kansas children maximum access to auditory input during a critical period of language development. 

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KIDS Network

The Kansas Infant Death and SIDS Network works to prevent the risk of SIDS.

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The tragedy of infant death touches hundreds of Kansas families every year. The Kansas Infant Death and SIDS (KIDS) Network supports individuals who have experienced such a loss, as well as organizations working to reduce the risk of infant death through education, training, and research. A major focus of the Network’s outreach is promoting safe sleep practices through such initiatives as: creating a statewide Safe Sleep Infrastructure, Safe Sleep Community Baby Showers, Cribs for Kids collaboration, safe sleep education for new and expectant parents, and safe sleep instructor training for health and child care providers.

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Parents as Teachers

Parents as Teachers offers home visits for new parents to stimulate child learning and development. 

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Teaching parents to stimulate early development and learning within the home is the focus of Kansas Parents as Teachers (PAT). An affiliate of the national PAT model, the program is administered through local school districts by the Kansas State Department of Education, and has four interrelated components: personal visits, group connections, screening, and resource connections. Using a research-informed curriculum, certified parent educators work directly with families to identify goals and monitor progress, with an emphasis on parent-child interaction and development-centered parenting. Educators also refer families to community services and resources, as needed.

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Child Care Assistance

Child Care Assistance funding provides support for families needing child care, enabling parents to work or improve job skills.

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Affordable child care makes it possible for parents to find and keep the kinds of jobs that can support a family. When that care is high quality, children are better prepared to start school. The Kansas Child Care Assistance program offers access to these dual benefits for families in need, enabling parents to work (and/or improve job skills) while their children receive quality child care. 

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Children’s Mental Health Waiver

The Children’s Mental Health Waiver provides access to outpatient services for children diagnosed with Serious Emotional Disturbance.

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Sometimes a child’s mental health needs exceed what the family is capable of providing. A diagnosis of Serious Emotional Disturbance (SED) often leads to inpatient psychiatric treatment —and the added distress for that child of being removed from home. The SED Waiver grants access to services that can allow a child to remain in a familiar environment by providing the intensive support necessary to ensure both safety and independence.

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Family Preservation Services

Family Preservation Services provides intensive in-home services for families at-risk.

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Keeping children out of foster care has been shown to reduce problems later in life. By helping families cope with a range of issues—from economic to social—that might otherwise lead to child abuse and neglect, Family Preservation Services (FPS) offers families the tools they need to stay together. FPS includes making a formal assessment of the family’s situation; developing a step-by-step plan to achieve family well-being; and guiding families toward community-based resources and supports. Families are active participants throughout the process, from identifying obstacles to selecting services that address identified needs. 

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Infant-Toddler Services

Infant-Toddler Services builds family capacity to meet the needs of children who have disabilities or developmental delays.

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What happens in the first three years of a child’s life can have a profound impact on their development and life-long quality of life. This is especially true for infants and toddlers who have a developmental delay or disability. In accordance with the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004, Infant-Toddler Services (also known as tiny-k or Part C) helps families access needed services in a natural environment, whether the home, a child care facility, or other community setting. Working with families, care providers, and other community partners, Infant-Toddler Services provides early intervention services and promotes early screening and detection of developmental delays.

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Maternal and Child Health Home Visiting

Provides home visiting services for pregnant women, new mothers, and infants.

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To help new parents give their child the healthiest possible start in life, Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Home Visiting, formerly known as Healthy Start Home Visitor, offers outreach and referral services to pregnant women and families with babies up to one year of age. The aim of MCH Home Visiting is to increase the number of women receiving comprehensive health care and services during pregnancy and beyond. Home visits provide opportunities to observe the home environment, identify needs and supports for reaching family goals, and adapt interventions to meet needs. 

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Tobacco Use Prevention Program

Works toward tobacco-free environments for children and families

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According to the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, each year another 1,500 Kansas children become daily smokers, while statewide health care expenditures related to smoking already top $1.1 billion. To reduce the physical and fiscal toll of tobacco use, the Kansas Tobacco Use Prevention Program supports community efforts to employ evidence-based strategies designed to keep young people from using tobacco, help tobacco users quit, and reduce non-smokers’ exposure to tobacco.
Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids (2018). The Toll of Tobacco in Kansas. https://www.tobaccofreekids.org/problem/toll-us/kansas

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