Lemonade for Life: A Transformative Tool for Change

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Research is clear that the effects of negative early childhood experiences don’t end when a child becomes an adult. The more Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) that a child experiences, the greater the risk for health problems, mental illness, and substance abuse as an adult (Felitti et al., 1998). Although we can’t rewrite the beginning of our story, we can change the way it ends. Building resiliency skills, engendering hope, and changing mindset are ways that practitioners and communities can break the cycle and transfer of negative early childhood experiences from one generation to the next.

Lemonade for Life is an interactive training that was developed by researchers and practitioners in Iowa and Kansas who felt an urgency to use what we know about ACEs to help families understand patterns in their lives. Universally, parents want a better life for their children. Lemonade for Life builds on this commonality and helps families understand that they are strong and already possess some resiliency skills. The six-hour training provides professionals with techniques to start conversations with families about their past experiences with the goal of helping them understand that they have the power to change the path for their children. Professionals receive tools to use with parents to develop a Resiliency Plan and to better understand early brain development and how they can influence their child’s early experiences.

Contrary to what some believe, these conversations are not invasive or traumatic. Parents often feel validated and understood after talking about their early experiences. Practice helps professionals become more comfortable in having what we fear is going to be a difficult conversation.

Hope is a powerful antidote to negative early childhood experiences and has the power to change neurochemistry (Groopman, 2004). We, as professionals, play an essential role in creating a culture of hope and fostering a mindset that lets families know that we believe in them. Everyone needs a champion.

To learn more about getting your own lemonade stand and helping families tap into their own power to change, visit lemonadeforlife.org.

Jackie Counts
Director of the Center for Public Partnerships & Research
University of Kansas

Forming Public-Private Funding Partnerships

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In a world of tightly-restricted public funds, it is essential that ambitious, high-impact nonprofits hoping to thrive and grow get serious about raising money from private sources.

How does an organization go about this? These days, one should assume that the entry “price of poker” is a strong program model that reliably delivers satisfying results to those served, plus at least some level of formal evidence of real impact.

Once in the game, what really differentiates the winners is their skill at identifying and developing sound partnerships with a particular type of funder – one having strong strategic alignment with the organization’s work.

While it is tempting to believe that the pathway to sustained private funding lies in making as many calls as possible to a wide diversity of sources, a study by the Bridgespan Group demonstrated the limitations of this approach. Astonishingly, the study found that 90% of the largest nonprofits founded after 1970 were fueled by financial models that relied on a single category of funder – e.g. corporations, fee-paying customers, private individuals or foundations – with whom they shared clear, sustainable, mutual interests.

How can a nonprofit leader identify attractive partnership candidates? A starting point is to ask the following questions:

  • What real social change or benefit results from my work?
  • Who deeply cares about that result?
  • Of those who care, who controls discretionary money?
  • Why should these parties see my organization as the solution to their need?
  • How can we best make our case to them?

Once a leader has candidly answered these questions, there is likely to be work to do before approaching potential partners, perhaps in strengthening the organization’s team or results, perhaps simply in tightening its “pitch.” Whatever the challenge, these leaders should keep firmly in mind this truth – sound partnerships are 2-way streets and the right partners need you as much as you need them.

Paul Carttar
Senior Advisor at the Bridgespan Group
Former Director of the Social Innovation Fund

The Cabinet Welcomes Amy Blosser!

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We are pleased to welcome our new Early Childhood Director, Amy Blosser, who brings years of professional experience working on behalf of children and families in Kansas. She is a self-starter who values different perspectives to inform strong programs and unite support for children and families.

Amy graduated from the University of Kansas with a degree in Human Development and Family Life with an emphasis in Early Childhood Education. She has experience in program management, grant writing, policy development, compliance, and, most recently served as the Director of Head Start and Early Head Start in Topeka.

Amy has three children, a son who is 16 and two daughters, 14 and 11. She loves to be outside or “on the go” including traveling, kayaking, hiking, snow skiing, and golfing, and frequently discovers new interests through her sense of adventure. She enjoys spending time with friends and family and gets the greatest joy from watching her children participate in their activities.  Amy brings this energy and enthusiasm to her role as Early Childhood Director. We are thrilled to have Amy as part of our Cabinet family! Please join us in welcoming her at Amy.Blosser@dcf.ks.gov and (785) 296-4536.

Spotlight: Four County Mental Health Center

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Four County Mental Health Center embraces May as Mental Health Awareness Month. This is a time to confront the stigma of mental illness by educating our communities about what mental health means, how it impacts children and adults, and how early intervention can transform the lives of those affected.

Across Kansas thousands of children, youth, and adults experience mental health problems every year. In Southeastern Kansas, Four County Mental Health Center provides a continuum of services, because wellness looks different for each person. Everyone needs something different, and Four County is there to help. Some of the many out-patient services we offer include therapy, medication management, case management services for youth and adults, after-school and summer psychosocial groups, parent education classes, supported employment, and 24-hour crisis services. In particular, the Early Childhood Block Grant, funded through the Kansas Children’s Cabinet and Trust Fund, allows the Center to target services to one of the state’s most vulnerable populations: children under the age of five and mothers, both prenatal and postpartum.

The early years of a child’s life are the most critical for healthy development, but traumatic events can negatively impact a child’s brain, affecting executive functioning, emotional regulation, and the ability to cope with stress. Without intervention, the effects can be life-long with repercussions for the family, the child, and the child’s future work and family-life. Support from caring, knowledgeable professionals can make a positive, lasting difference; and the earlier problems are identified and addressed, the better. Timely family case management and consultation services can decrease the need for services later in life, when untreated issues may have had time to compound. Four County Mental Health Center is proud to serve these children and their families.

As we enjoy longer hours of sunshine during Mental Health Awareness Month, let’s also shine a light on the good that comes from rejecting the stigma of mental illness, and identifying and supporting mental health needs as early as possible. By doing so, we will nurture healthier and happier children, families, and communities.

 

Tammy Blaich, MS, LCP, LCAC, IMH-E®II

Director of Community Based Services

Four County Mental Health Center

Autism Awareness Month: How Do We Reach Every Child with Autism in Kansas?

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What comes to mind when you think about the month of April? First thoughts may include spring flowers, rain showers, or the height of allergy season in Kansas. For those of us working with children, we may also think about autism, for April is the month to become more aware of this disorder that affects 1 in 68 children.

Over the years, Autism Awareness Month has become more recognized across the world. In Kansas, the Technical Assistance Network (TASN) – Autism & Tertiary Behavior Supports, works to raise awareness and provide support every day to local communities through our efforts supported by both the Kansas State Department of Education and the Kansas Children’s Cabinet and Trust Fund.

Early intervention is critical to improving outcomes for children with autism, but, without reliable diagnosis tools, it can be difficult to reach all the children who could benefit from these services. Seven years ago, our team met this challenge by setting an ambitious goal: to provide timely and accessible autism spectrum disorder diagnostic services to all children in Kansas through a systematic model. With support from KU Medical Center’s Center for Child Health & Development (CCHD) and KU Medical Center’s Center for Telemedicine and Telehealth, we have since trained over 50 teams from school districts and Tiny-K Infant-Toddler networks to provide evidence-based evaluations in their communities for children who have screened positive for autism spectrum disorder. With the support of CCHD, the teams and families connect via Telemedicine for the final diagnostic impressions and, as a collaborative medical, educational, and family team, create a plan of recommendations for the child.

The impact of our model surprises us every day. We now have teams in 100 out of 105 counties in Kansas. We have helped over 569 children and their families. With our funding partners, we have decreased costs. While we are proud of these statistics, we are more honored to work with dedicated professionals, loving parents, and incredible children. As we continue to improve, our families and children are #1 to us. In a recent Parent Satisfaction Survey, one parent summarized her family’s experience stating, “It was not the diagnosis I was expecting, but the wake-up call I needed.” For us, that is awareness and acceptance!

Sarah A. Hoffmeier, LMSW
Family Services & Training Coordinator
TASN Autism & Tertiary Behavior Supports

Strong Community Partnerships Help Pine Ridge Prep Deliver Integrated Services

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Upon entering the doors of Pine Ridge Prep Preschool it doesn’t take long to realize that it is anything but a typical preschool. From the school uniforms to the monthly family nights to community events – it is evident Pine Ridge Prep is a unique and special place. Staff members are more like a family than co-workers and they all truly enjoy coming to work each day!

Pine Ridge Prep is a Topeka Public Schools preschool made possible through a grant from United Way of Greater Topeka, who is a recipient of Early Childhood Block Grant funding. Pine Ridge Prep serves children from Head Start, Early Childhood Special Education, and the community. The children play and grow together in the same classroom as they learn math, literacy, and social-emotional skills. The students receive breakfast, lunch, and a snack and enjoy outside play time.

Another feature unique to Pine Ridge Prep, parents sign a contract at the beginning of each year agreeing to volunteer at the school for a minimum of two hours each month. Pine Ridge Prep knows how important parent involvement is to a child’s success and offers parents numerous opportunities to achieve their volunteer hours. Some opportunities include, monthly family nights, Parent Tip Tuesdays, Breakfast and Bonding, Conscious Discipline, and parenting groups. Parents are also welcome in their child’s classroom at any time.

Pine Ridge Prep has strong partnerships throughout the Topeka community that ensure students, families, and the Pine Ridge Community are given the tools that they need to succeed. In 2014, Pine Ridge received the Ad Astra Award at the Kansas Housing Conference for “Excellence in Partnership,” as well as the 2014 National School Board Magnum Award. Pine Ridge Prep would not be where it is today without great partnerships!!

Cabinet grantee, USD 489, participates in You and Your Young Child television program

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Cabinet-funded ECBG and CBCAP grantee, Unified School District #489 in Hays has partnered with local business Eagle Communications to produce “You and Your Young Child” or “YYC.” Sponsored by local businesses Miner Family Dentistry and the Sternberg Museum of Natural History, YYC airs daily on the local cable network and is devoted to subjects related to early childhood.

USD 489 began filming YYC in December of 2009 and just completed their fifth year on the air. Up to four segments are filmed a month with each segment airing for an entire week. YYC is a great way for local agencies to educate the community about their services and upcoming events.

Over the last 5 years, over 130 episodes have been filmed on a variety of early childhood subjects. A few stand out to USD 489, including a segment filmed in 2012 with a local counselor on helping children deal with grief during the holidays. The episode with the highest ratings featured USD 489 Early Childhood Grants Coordinator, Dana Stanton, and a representative from the Kansas Highway Patrol discussing how to properly install a car seat. During this episode, the Highway Patrol simulated a 5 mile per hour car crash to demonstrate the importance of seat belts for both young children and adults.

A full listing of the You and Your Young Child episodes can be seen at:  http://haysparents.com/you-and-your-young-child/

 

Congratulations, Jane!

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After six years with the Cabinet, Jane Weiler will retire on Friday, November 7.

Jane has dedicated her career to the well-being of children and families in Kansas. Her leadership has had an immeasurable impact across the state. She was named the Children’s Cabinet’s first Early Childhood Director. In that role, she established a strong, sustainable structure for the Cabinet to administer the Early Childhood Block Grants. She is able to balance the big picture with the details of program administration. She is well-loved by partners, colleagues, and grantees – even when reports are due. Jane’s caring, even-keeled approach has been a positive presence in many meetings or discussions.

You will be missed, Jane!

Domestic Violence

October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month

Domestic Violence has a big impact on the smallest victims.

Domestic violence includes physical, emotional, financial, and sexual abuse. Domestic violence affects all communities and all social-economic levels. Growing up in a violent home can have devastating effects on a child, impeding their growth, development, and overall quality of life. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, at least 750,000 children a year witness domestic violence, and in Kansas in one day alone 727 victims of domestic violence sought help. One out of every four children has been exposed to violent behaviors between their parents or caregivers.

Most children will be affected in some way by the tension and stress of being exposed to a violent home, and children zero to five are especially vulnerable due to their rapidly developing brain. Research shows that the impact of violence is associated with adverse outcomes for children’s development and that younger children appear to exhibit higher levels of emotional and psychological distress than older children, leading to possible outcomes of behavior, social, and emotional problems in their future. Some adverse effects frequently associated with children from violent homes include eating routine and sleeping routine disruption, bed wetting, nightmares, aggression and anxiety.

Because children are the secondary victims of this often silent abuse, caregivers and adults who work with them need the awareness and skills to recognize and meet the needs of children exposed to violence in the home. Recognizing the signs of domestic abuse and its effects on children can be tricky and uncomfortable but is a first step in the right direction. Check out these websites to learn more:

Kansas Coalition Against Sexual & Domestic Violence: http://www.kcsdv.org/

Futures Without Violence: http://www.futureswithoutviolence.org/

Building a Stronger Kansas

The first five years of life are a period of incredible growth in all areas of a child’s development. A newborn’s brain is only about one-quarter the size of an adult’s, yet by age five has grown to about 90 percent of its adult size with 700 new neural connections forming every second. Because a child’s brain develops rapidly during this time, early, intensive support, especially when focused on at-risk children and families, can be effective in alleviating factors that lead to poor outcomes for children.

A focus on these early years of life is the center of policy and programming discussions of the early childhood community in Kansas. Effective early childhood systems provide diverse services and resources for children, families, and communities to support healthy development, strong families, and early learning. The Kansas Children’s Cabinet is particularly interested in public-private partnerships that engage in both evidence-based and innovative practices that mutually reinforce a comprehensive early childhood system that leads to long-term outcomes for children and families. The Kansas Children’s Cabinet believes that their investments in early childhood programs and services, with a particular focus on at-risk children, will lead to a stronger Kansas.

Click here to learn more about the strategic framework that helps guide the work of the Kansas Children’s Cabinet, the Blueprint for Early Childhood.